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ANALYSIS  After the fall of  Libya, the West set its sights on the next project, which we now know as the Syria conflict, a conflict which has destroyed one of the most beautiful and stable countries on earth and created millions of refugees inside and outside a nation where once no one slept on the street. The West has pursued it’s own cold hard interest in this war without taking into account the realities – that the rebels they have backed have failed to hold any ground. The Western allies blame Russia – and so does the UN Secretary General – for prolonging this conflict by which they clearly mean the fall of the regime of Bashar al Assad and the resulting chaos that would have followed the collapse of central authority in SYRIA. RUSSIA is not the bad guy here – along with China it blocked NATO bombing which would have had a disastrous effect on Syria and it’s people. NATO bombing in Libya which backed militias may have succeeded in uprooting the regime of Colonel Gaddafi but that success has resulted in chaos, with waves and waves of desperate people fleeing the violence. Of course, Russia wasn’t the only country with its own interest in this conflict – there was also Iran who backed Hezbollah in defending the Lebanese border town of Zabadani against al Nusra (al Qaeda) and ISIS fighters. Now Russia has entered the conflict directly with the building of a naval base in the picturesque town of LATAKIA which will hold up to a thousand soldiers. Hopefully this move will serve as a warning to the war crazed US and its Western allies that continuing to back the failed Free Syrian Army is an enterprise not worth pursuing. Moscow is hoping this show of force will strengthen Bashar al Assad’s hand around the negotiating table and convince the US to back Damascus in reversing the advance of DAESH. It’s also hoping that this will be an end to any more military adventures from what is still the most powerful country on earth, a country which should have learned from fighting in Afghanistan, Iraq as well as it’s experiences in Libya, Somalia and Pakistan, that there is a limit to what even a superpower can achieve.

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